Earthbound and Down

Perhaps the most sobering thought is that, after a lifetime of dreaming, I’m still going to die on this planet. That after thinking about galaxies, looking up at the stars, writing about extra-planetary travel, reading books and listening to programs about life out there, and trying to raise myself above whatever provincial concerns that surround me in my own life (wherever I happen to be), that at the end of it all, it is on Terra Prime, a small blue planet orbiting Sol on the mid-western arm of the Milky Way, is where I will spend my last breath.

Somewhere in this black thought is a faint blue line of hope in the spectrograph, but I can barely see it.

Eighteen

At 18 years old, my domain is now old enough to vote. Watch out, all you zombies!

$ whois phaysis.com
Domain Name: PHAYSIS.COM
Creation Date: 2000-04-14T14:49:59Z
Updated Date: 2018-03-06T03:32:22Z
Registry Expiry Date: 2019-04-14T14:49:59Z

It’s really a trip that I’ve held on to this domain for so long, but it’s become an extension of my voice as well as a weight on my shoulders. I carry it around like my backpack, loaded with memories and needs and supplies and useful things.

As I’ve probably said before, I got this domain on a whim as a place to try my hand at this HTML/Javascript/CSS/Perl thing, as a playground for writing and art. Once I moved to Austin, a scant few months after I founded the site, it was useful as way to keep my friends back home informed on my life. 18 years hence, we’ve largely parted ways, and my artistic and writing output has waned, but the site remains. I remain.

Thank you for continuing to check in.

Dit-Dah

I’ve decided that I need to take my radio hobby to a new direction. I have difficulty getting out of the region with my radio and antennas with only voice communications. I haven’t gotten into the digital modes because, honestly, I don’t have a decent laptop to do it. Everything I have is kind of a hack.

If I want to log any sort of long distance (DX) contacts, I’m gonna have to use something that’s not voice. I’m jealous of the stations that talk about logging contacts from South America, Europe, Africa, places all over the world, on 10 Watts or less. I’m over here going “how the hell did they do that? I’m using 100 Watts!” The answer is Morse Code. Once you learn it, it’s fairly easy to make contacts that are readable — the code key turns the radio transmitter on when you key down, so either the radio signal is there, or it isn’t. It’s the most efficient use to radio energy ever.

In that light, what I’m proposing to do is dedicate the month of April 2018 to learning Morse Code. All 26 letters, all 10 numbers, all important punctuation. I want to be able to hear and key the code proficiently by month’s end.

I have a few apps, among them is one called Morse Machine. It’s pretty decent, and it allows me to learn code using the Koch method, which is recommended (it plays symbols at their normal speed with extra space between so I have time to recognize the sound and type the symbol). Once I can demonstrate a high enough proficiency with a few symbols, it unlocks the next group.

My plan is to do this for at least 15 minutes a day, every day. I already got far enough along, but since it’s been a few months since I last tried practicing, I’ve forgotten it all. So this time around, I’m going to clear my training scores and start from scratch. It’s really the only way.

I hope I can get up to at least 10 WPM by month’s end, at least for being able to hear code. I have a practice code key at home with an oscillator so I can pound it out without going over the air. But really, the best practice is to just Get On The Air. But first I need to learn the language.

Wish me luck.