Blast and Blow

To catch you up to date: when I set my radio output to 100W full power in the car with the new mobile antenna, the SWR is so bad that the radio lowers its output power to 40W to save itself.

I experimented with a few hypothetical fixes:

  • Run on 12V battery instead of the car’s power system, in case the power system was actually not able to provide full current; no change. Power system is functional.
  • Disassemble antenna mount and scrape paint layers between adjoining parts for better conductivity; no change. DC conductivity is not the same as RF conductivity.
  • Adjust the ground strap and tighten connections; no change
  • Coil more feedline into 4″ turns as a poor-man’s feedline choke; no change
  • Clamp on a bigger ferrite choke outside the trunk lid and run more turns through it; no change
  • Run the feedline directly into a dummy load (a resistor with a heatsink); success at 100W. The antenna is to blame, and the radio is OK.
  • Insert my manual antenna tuner between the radio and antenna and adjust for best SWR: success at 100W

So, yeah, my initial assumption that I’ll need an automatic antenna tuner unit (ATU) holds up. The issue is that the antenna, the car underneath it, and the ground underneath the car together have the kind of reactance (impedance to alternating current due to inductance or capacitance instead of pure resistance) that causes more energy to get stored in the antenna system and then sent back down the line to the radio. The antenna tuner injects enough of the right kind of reactance to reduce feedback and make the radio happy.

Once I got the manual tuner set right, the radio was able to pump a full 100W on CW. Success. An automatic tuner will make that a breeze.

So tonight I was out and about on a drive. Pulled off the road to raise the antenna and make some tests and contacts on 40 meters. SWR was bad, so I inserted the manual tuner. Instead of digging into my radio box for the pushbutton I typically use to trigger the CW tone, I decided to flip over to FM modulation because, like CW, it has a 100% duty cycle (a solid signal to test power output). With a few keydowns resulting in low power output, I reached over to tweak the tuner knobs and get better SWR. Suddenly, the radio pumped out full power — for 4 seconds before it blinked off and died.

My initial concern was that the radio was fried, or worse, I had fried the custom power circuit I had installed, or even worse, I had killed my car and was stranded in BFE — none was the case, thankfully. The culprit was the 10A fuses I had installed in the inline fuse blocks (I designed the system for 25A fuses, but downgraded to 10A for paranoia reasons).

10A X 13.8V = 138W

138W is realistically more than my radio should consume, but there are losses inside the radio, voltage drops in the power line, and FM modulation spreads the signal out over a 3KHz bandwidth and consumes more power than CW signals.

So there you have it. I fried my first fuse.

Once I made it home in silent humility, I replaced the fuses with 15A units which should be able to take the heat and still be safe. I think that should be enough, but time will tell.

I learned a few things this week.

The Go Forward Backoff

Went to Belton, TX for the Ham Radio Expo held there twice a year. Big swapmeet and convention. Picked up a trunk-lip antenna mount for the car and a multiband antenna for HF — 80m through 2m. Cool thing about the antenna is that instead of using lossy traps to keep the antenna resonant for each band, it features jacks along the length so you can use the included jumper cable to manually select each band.

I took the new kit out yesterday for a test run, and unfortunately I’m not impressed. When connected to my antenna analyzer, the SWR on the antenna looks like it could go down to 1.25:1 after tweaking the length of the whip, but the moment I connect it to my radio and push 100W, the SWR gets so bad that my radio automatically backs off its power output to save itself. 40W is the limit, apparently.

My biggest suspicion is that the antenna mount isn’t fully grounded to the car frame. The frame is an essential part of the antenna system (it functions as the ground plane for the vertical antenna), and if it’s not properly connected, that RF energy goes back down the feedline and into the radio.

The mount has a rubber pad to protect the paint on the topside, and the clamp on the underside has four set-screws, an unpainted metal plate for protection, and that’s directly against the painted underside of the lip. What I need to do is take my roll of steel grounding strap and run that under the lip clamp, over to a bolt hole under the trunk decking, down to the trunk mount, and then underneath to the frame with some sort of lock washers and bolts to dig into the paint a little. Electrical conductivity is not the same as RF conductivity, and it’s for that reason that the ground strap is necessary.

If I still don’t get any better results, I’ll have to get an ATU (Automatic Tuner Unit) and put it electrically close to the antenna mount and run a line from that to the radio. Maybe even rewire the mount with a thicker cable. As long as the ATU can get a good tune, the radio won’t care and I might be able to run full power.

All antennas are compromise antennas. Too bad I can’t run a dipole on my car, eh? More news to follow.

Confirmation

I feel like this is a milestone: I got my first QSL card!

QSL card from KM4LZM, front side

QSL card from KM4LZM, front side

QSL card from KM4LZM, back side

QSL card from KM4LZM, back side

In the days before computerized logs and log matching services, amateur radio enthusiasts exchanged these postcards confirming contact. Older and more experienced hams have stacks of these from all over. This is the first in my own collection. I guess it’s time for me to print some of my own to send out!

“QSL” is a ham shorthand code that means “I confirm receipt”. And yes, I fixed my log so it matches what’s actually in my handwritten logbook, which is close to what he has in his log.

So yeah. Thanks, George KM4LZM! A big salute to ya!

Surplus

Was just thinking about a guy I went to high school with. Boyd. He was a cool cat; we had mechanical drawing class together. Anyway, he was into model aircraft as a hobby. I was into model railroad. We bonded for a short few years, satellites to each other’s planet.

Funny that I remember him by full name almost 30 years later. But whatever; hope he’s doing well.

Got me thinking about my chosen hobbies. Strange, but it seems I’ve gravitated to the exact same sorts of hobbies that didn’t exist until the post-war period after 1945. Model railroads. Model planes. Ham radio. Home electronics. Hi-fi stereos. Electronic music.

Really, these are all a product of the post-war suburban ethic, that part of American culture, that part of the American landscape, that’s only made possible by a life of planned stability, of suburbs and highways and open space. That dream of owning a piece of God’s green earth, of being part of a community, of having enough free resources to dispose of that we’re allowed the luxury of committing ourselves and our talents to things that aren’t immediately necessary for survival.

I can eat just fine without a radio. I can get around OK without building my own engine.

This is all part of the American Dream, strange as it sounds. I like radio for the engineering aspect, for the technical problems, for the creative solutions, for the edification that comes from learning so much about physical laws. But I understand my privilege: I have enough disposable income to throw at these pursuits. I have enough free time to dedicate to it. I have enough time to craft it, build it, use it, enjoy it, share it, talk about it, and go to meetings about it.

Really, it’s the modern equivalent of pruning bonsai trees; it’s the human hope that we have enough, make enough, own enough, and aren’t too hungry and infirm that we can spend a few hours a week to trimming a few leaves and keeping a fruit-bearing tree so small that it doesn’t bear fruit, and we don’t starve because of it.

That, that right there, is the post-war American dream. The stuff that so many of the books that I checked out of my junior-high library showed to me. That I can have a life where I can do things that aren’t necessary for survival, that aren’t crucial to the continued existence of myself and those around me, that are fun. Fun! That’s the Dream.

I think it’s in that vast, breathless hope, that I enjoy my hobbies. And now, in repose, I understand why I do this.

Know your causes.

Slap Head

For those who are keeping score, I’m a dumbass.

So, I have a file server at my home that’s running FreeNAS, which is based on FreeBSD, a popular Unix distribution. I have around 7.4 terabytes of storage capacity across 5 disks; that’s a lot of personal files. I bought a single 8TB disk for the purposes of backing up this mountain of data. The problem is that my methods of making exact copies of files to the disk were failing or taking too long to complete, so the backups were slow and not always good.

When you’re dealing with terabytes of data, everything’s slow and insufficient.

Well, the problem is that I was looking at the problem from the wrong point of view. On my personal workstation, which runs Linux and uses the ext4 filesystem, I have a stack of scripts that basically run “rsync” to make exact copies to a portable 2TB disk. This method is what I tried on the FreeNAS box. Due to the way rsync operates under the hood, especially on complex filesystems where there are lots of hardlinked files, it was occasionally consuming all of the free memory on the fileserver and eventually dying after a few hours of churning, sometimes with no files actually copied.

“There has to be a better way to do this,” I thought. “I guess I’ll split the disk up into smaller chunks and make scripts to do it that way.”

And then, like a strike of lightning, it hit me: this FreeNAS box isn’t running on an ext4 filesystem — it’s running ZFS. What feature does ZFS have that ext4 doesn’t? That’s right — snapshots. Futuristic, amazing, wonderful snapshots. And what can you do with these snapshots? That’s right, you can replicate them, bit-for-bit, to another disk or remote system. Woah.

Just slap me now.

So, I did what any sane person would do: use the available tools as intended. I made a snapshot. I then wiped the backup disk clean, and am currently replicating that snapshot to the backup disk. Then, once the initial snapshot is there, I can take incremental snapshots at later dates and push them to the backup disk in a significantly shorter amount of time.

Use what’s available to you. That’s the key lesson here. This is liberating. Let’s hope this works!